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This MIT student turned a boring dorm room into a design masterpiece

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Banti Gheneti chose his current dorm room at MIT at the end of his freshman year because the walls, unlike the usual white-walled student housing, were a shade of violet.
Banti Gheneti chose his current dorm room at MIT at the end of his freshman year because the walls, unlike the usual white-walled student housing, were a shade of violet. Courtesy of Banti Gheneti

Banti Gheneti chose his current dorm room at MIT at the end of his freshman year. It wasn’t the biggest dorm in his building and it looked pretty average — a radiator under the one rectangular window, pipes against the walls, electrical wires astray.

Gheneti was attracted to the room because the walls, unlike the usual white-walled student housing, were a shade of violet.

“The walls gave it potential,’’ Gheneti told Boston.com.

Those violet walls are the only part of Gheneti’s dorm you’d recognize today.

Now a junior, the computer science and electrical engineering major designed his entire room to look the way it does today – there’s a lofted bed with rainbow lights glowing from the underside, a laminate floor and meticulous detailing on the doors.

Gheneti just won our BostonDormContest, where students across the state submitted photos of their rooms for the chance to win $1,000 for the coolest dorm in Massachusetts.

Story continues after gallery.

See inside Gheneti’s dorm at MIT:

Lucky for Gheneti, he lives in a dorm on campus where students are allowed to make adjustments to their room to fit their needs and wants.

In fact, our 2014 dorm contest winner, Ciara Kamahele, was from the same dorm as Gheneti.

Like Kamahele (and other students in the building), Gheneti constructed the loft-style bed totally on his own.

But this is not his first rodeo – Gheneti’s current bed is his third (and favorite) loft he has built at MIT thus far.

“Most of my construction experience started when I came to MIT,’’ Gheneti said. “I hadn’t used power tools before and so I built my first loft at the beginning of my freshman year.’’

His first construction had four posts and was made with scrap wood he collected from an orientation project.

“It was more janky,’’ he said. “And then I built a new loft at the end of my freshman year during the summer. It had four posts and was still deficient in a few ways.’’

The current loft, which has no posts and is attached to the ceiling, took him a month and a half to construct. Two of those weeks were spent staining each piece of wood two to three times.

“It’s not supported from the floor,’’ Gheneti said. “It’s supported from the ceiling using a concrete anchor and it’s ridiculously thick. It can hold thousands of pounds — more than I will ever need.’’

He likes the sleek look and how it opens up an otherwise small room. He even constructed the ladder so that when he is not in the bed, it folds up to get off the floor and out of his way.

“I also like the wood finish,’’ Gheneti said. “I wanted a nice warm color. It’s slightly different from the table, floor, and speakers.’’

But the loft blends in well with the surroundings below, which he also did himself. When Gheneti first got the room at the end of his freshman year, he went to Home Depot and bought laminate floors to install.

“I was just sleeping on the floor, putting in more pieces and eventually I was done,’’ he said.

Gheneti has a few other cool perks in his room as well – rainbow lights installed on the underside of the loft are wirelessly controlled from his phone.

“I got sheets of gloss acrylics and tons of LED strips,’’ he said. How did he learn to do all of this? “You just experiment and eventually you just have more of a intuition for finding a balance between design and simplicity,’’ he said.

It’s as simple as that.