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By Design: How an enormous entry became a welcoming and multifunctional space

Ask the Expert Style
Cara-Fineman-Entryway-Mockup
. Cara Fineman

This scheme is loosely based on a foyer Cara Fineman of Dover-based DAG Design recently came up with for a client. The family had lived in their home for nearly five years and had no idea what to do with this very large, very open foyer, so it essentially just stayed empty.

To bring this room to life, Fineman implemented a color palette of soft blues and warm earth tones and a natural materials palette that includes leather, rattan, jute, and reclaimed wood. “My client wanted this room to feel bright, cheerful, and welcoming,” Fineman said. “And, although the home is nowhere near the ocean, she asked for a coastal, bohemian vibe.”

This entry is just off the living room, so the owner appreciates the view of the entry. Instead of this being a pass-through space, it is a room the family actually spends time in. “My client told me that her two kids play cards and board games at the entry table,” Fineman reported. “They even do Zoom calls here when they’re looking for a change of scenery from the office or bedrooms.”

Here’s how to get that look:

Art Bright, cheerful artwork introduces color and personality into the space. The simplicity of the butterfly art plays off the abstract floral diptych on the center wall, which is a vibrant focal point. (butterfly prints, $195 each; floral prints, $595 each at scoutdesignstudio.com)

Bench The playful bench legs with hoof feet brings smiles and offers a convenient spot for guests to drop their jackets or purses when they enter the home. ($950 at hudsoninteriordesigns.com)

Center table A small dining table works perfectly in this entry hall. It’s made of polished concrete, so the smooth surface is a nice juxtaposition to the more textural elements in the room. ($899 at cb2.com)

Console table A console table always makes sense in an entry as a spot to drop mail, face masks, and keys. The whitewashed reclaimed wood has heft but doesn’t feel the least bit heavy. ($2,147.20 at scoutandnimble.com)

Light The cascading rattan chandelier brings all sorts of interest to the center of the room with its earthy texture, tiered silhouette, and 1920s Victorian sensibility. ($1,998 at serenaandlily.com)

Mirror An entry also calls for a mirror so you can check your hair. This artisan-made, hand-forged brass mirror helps to elevate the space, balancing the more casual rattan and jute pieces. ($2,295 at rh.com)

Plant Fineman tries to include plants in all her designs, but because the client was hesitant about upkeep, she opted for a faux fiddle leaf plant in a mid-century modern planter. It requires zero maintenance but makes a stylish statement. ($380 at westelm.com)

Rug This braided, bleached jute rug has the casual, beachy vibe Fineman’s client was hoping to achieve. ($1,198 at serenaandlily.com)

Stools The tulip bases of these stools add a hint of mid-century modern style, while the warm, brown leather cushions whisper ’70s chic. ($499 at schoolhouse.com)

Wallpaper Since the client wanted to infuse the entry with color but didn’t want anything too jarring or busy, Fineman used a Persian-inspired pattern that feels fresh and is one of her favorites. ($193.20 per roll at mahoneswallpapershop.com)

Marni Elyse Katz blogs about design at StyleCarrot.com. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter @globehomes. Subscribe to our free real estate newsletter — our weekly digest on buying, selling, and design — at pages.email.bostonglobe.com/AddressSignUp.